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Top Rated Lutefisk Recipes

by
morgainegeiser
I grew up eatting lutefisk and this is my grandmas' lutefisk recipe. Most Norwegians serve their lutefisk with melted butter.
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by
Julie Leo
My Great Aunt would make this around the holidays. We always enjoyed it.
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by
Bergy
This is a traditional Swedish dish (also served in Norway but the Danes have more sense). It is a dish that you acquire a taste for (like Haggis). When you do acquire a taste you love it so I'm told. I have not cooked this recipe but it comes from a traditional source. This is not a joke this is an authentic recipe!
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by
anon-r1rnyeh5min4@base.google.com (ifood.tv)
Ingredients 8 small potatoes, peeled2 cups boiling water1 teaspoon salt1 pound lutefisk, cut in serving-sized pieces3 tablespoons butter or margarine2 tablespoons all-purpose flour1/2 teaspoon salt1/2 teaspoon dry mustard1 1/4 cups milk1/2 ...
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by
Ackman
There are some people (even Norwegians) that don't like lutefisk...I'm one of them! UFF DA is having Swedish meatballs at a Norwegian lutefisk supper!!!
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by
Tracey Seaman
Lefse Enjoyed year-round, these soft flatbreads are especially common during holidays. For many Norwegians, and members of Norwegian communities such as those in the Midwestern United States, making lefse symbolizes the start of the Christmas season. They can be either sweet or savory: On the Christmas Eve buffet, they often accompany lutefisk (preserved cod) and pork ribs, but as a snack, they're popular rolled up, spread with butter, and sprinkled with cinnamon-sugar. Lefse are traditionally made using special grooved rolling pins; large, superheated griddles; and long wooden spatulas. However, we found that a regular rolling pin, a 10-inch cast iron skillet, a pastry bench scraper, and a thin metal spatula worked just fine. Cooking the potatoes thoroughly and using a ricer or food mill will ensure that there will be no lumps in the potato dough.
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by
Tracey Seaman
Lefse Enjoyed year-round, these soft flatbreads are especially common during holidays. For many Norwegians, and members of Norwegian communities such as those in the Midwestern United States, making lefse symbolizes the start of the Christmas season. They can be either sweet or savory: On the Christmas Eve buffet, they often accompany lutefisk (preserved cod) and pork ribs, but as a snack, they're popular rolled up, spread with butter, and sprinkled with cinnamon-sugar. Lefse are traditionally made using special grooved rolling pins; large, superheated griddles; and long wooden spatulas. However, we found that a regular rolling pin, a 10-inch cast iron skillet, a pastry bench scraper, and a thin metal spatula worked just fine. Cooking the potatoes thoroughly and using a ricer or food mill will ensure that there will be no lumps in the potato dough.
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by
Tracey Seaman
Lefse Enjoyed year-round, these soft flatbreads are especially common during holidays. For many Norwegians, and members of Norwegian communities such as those in the Midwestern United States, making lefse symbolizes the start of the Christmas season. They can be either sweet or savory: On the Christmas Eve buffet, they often accompany lutefisk (preserved cod) and pork ribs, but as a snack, they're popular rolled up, spread with butter, and sprinkled with cinnamon-sugar. Lefse are traditionally made using special grooved rolling pins; large, superheated griddles; and long wooden spatulas. However, we found that a regular rolling pin, a 10-inch cast iron skillet, a pastry bench scraper, and a thin metal spatula worked just fine. Cooking the potatoes thoroughly and using a ricer or food mill will ensure that there will be no lumps in the potato dough.
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