Top Rated Irish Food Recipes

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RecipeTips.com
The lengthy slow cooking time of this dish, transforms a simple beef brisket and plain head of cabbage into a fantastic one-pot meal. This slow cooking whole meal recipe is sure to be a favorite of any Irish food lover.
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by
Cosima
"Boxty in the griddle, boxty in the pan, if you don't eat boxty, you'll never get a man." (Irish saying). From the book Celtic Folklore Cooking, by Joanne Asala. This is a very delicious, very famous, very traditional, very Irish food! Holidays associated with this recipe: Samhain, Mabon, Yule.
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by
Cosima
"Boxty in the griddle, boxty in the pan, if you don't eat boxty, you'll never get a man." (Irish saying). From the book Celtic Folklore Cooking, by Joanne Asala. This is a very delicious, very famous, very traditional, very Irish food! Holidays associated with this recipe: Samhain, Mabon, Yule.
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by
Greg Patent
Editor's note: The recipe and introductory text below are from A Baker's Odyssey by Greg Patent. I am indebted to Irish food expert and cookbook author Noreen Kinney, for sharing her family's Irish soda bread recipe. This bread is meant to be eaten plain with meals, or with cheese or with butter and jam, or used to sop up gravy. According to Noreen: Strictly speaking, there is no white Irish soda bread with raisins. Traditional Irish soda bread is brown, with a coarse texture and no fruit. It can also contain seeds and flax and bran, depending on the baker's desires. That is the reason I was shocked to see the white item passed off as Irish soda bread when I arrived in the States. However, in Ireland there is a famous old bread that was very popular with the poorer people in times past, and considered quite a treat for a special occasion or on Sundays. It is still popular today. Depending on which part of the country one is in, it is known as spotted dick or spotted dog. Basically it is derived from Irish soda bread, but it uses white flour in place of the traditional flours and other ingredients that go into the true Irish soda bread. To enrich the recipe, people added raisins when they became available, and they might add a full egg beaten into the milk, plus some white sugar. So it is the old Irish spotted dick that folks here call Irish Soda Bread. Everyone who makes Irish soda bread adds her or his own personal touches to the bread. To the mixture of whole wheat flour and white flour, Noreen, on any given day, might add wheat bran, oat bran, wheat germ, oats, sunflower seeds, flaxseeds, or poppy seeds. She varies proportions and grains depending on how she wants the bread to turn out. Think of the following proportions as guidelines, and feel free to vary the grain additions according to your tastes, adding from 4 to 5 ounces total by weight for each loaf. The bread's crust is coarse and firm, while the inside is rather dense but moist. A cross indented (not cut) on top of the bread allows the bread to be easily separated into quarters. Oddly, the sunflower seeds change color during baking, flecking the bread with an emerald green. The unexpected appearance of flecks of green in the bread the first time I made it surprised me. I could tell the color came from the sunflower seeds, but why did this happen? Food chemist Shirley Corriher, author of the classic Cookwise, had the answer. "Sunflower seeds are chock-full of good-for-you things," Shirley said, and by that she meant they're loaded with antioxidants. Among these are flavonoids, which turn yellow when they come into contact with an alkali (baking soda in the recipe). Other antioxidants, anthocyanins, react by turning blue. Put blue and yellow together, and you get green. Nifty.
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by
Cosima
"Boxty in the griddle, boxty in the pan, if you don't eat boxty, you'll never get a man." (Irish saying). From the book Celtic Folklore Cooking, by Joanne Asala. This is a very delicious, very famous, very traditional, very Irish food! Holidays associated with this recipe: Samhain, Mabon, Yule.
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Kiwi Kathy
Easy to make souffle that I found on the About.com web site under British & Irish Food section. The recipe says to bake the souffle in 6 individual ramekins but I made it in a large souffle dish and cooked it for 30 minutes. I used Edam cheese and American mustard as that was what was in the fridge.
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Cluich
Irish food isn't just for St. Patrick's Day. This is one of the best ways I've ever had salmon prepared.
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We adapted this recipe from the Irish food authority Darina Allen's book The Complete Book of Irish Country Cooking (Penguin Studio, 1996).
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daisey11
Great Irish food for get togethers and parties.
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Kiwi Kathy
Easy to make souffle that I found on the About.com web site under British & Irish Food section. The recipe says to bake the souffle in 6 individual ramekins but I made it in a large souffle dish and cooked it for 30 minutes. I used Edam cheese and American mustard as that was what was in the fridge.
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