Top Rated Daikon Recipes

Daikon Ramen with Skirt Steak
This noodle dish has the consistency and flavor profile of ramen noodles without the, well, ramen. Don’t get me wrong, I used to eat the instant stuff in college; it’s salty and addictively tasty, but has the nutritional value of cardboard. Whenever you eat, it’s important to ask yourself, “Is this food going to make me feel good? Is it what my body needs to get me through the day?” If the answer is no, ditch it. By swapping in the daikon here, you’re replacing the empty noodles with a root vegetable that’s rich in vitamin C and low in calories and carbohydrates. If I had only known in college! — Ali Maffucci, Insprialized
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5

apple waldorf
This Apple Waldorf With Daikon, Muscat Grapes, Walnuts, and Oxford Blue Dressing is unlike any salad you've had before. Consider this a classic salad reconstructed. If you can master the plating on this one, any house guest will be thoroughly impressed.Since 1991, the creative masterminds of Le Basque have executed some of the most elaborate and groundbreaking event productions in South Florida and across the map. Building a reputation for unparalleled service with true style and savoir-faire, Le Basque offers full-service catering and production design under the helm of Alejandro Muguerza, Jim Mozina, and Ian Perris. Le Basque proudly serves many high-profile and private clients. Such prestigious figures include President Barack Obama and President Clinton, international fashion houses including Cartier and Yves St. Laurent, and global conglomerates UBS and Sotheby’s.
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4.5

In the past few years, no other ethnic food has risen in popularity as dramatically as the Vietnamese sandwich. Vietnamese delis have popped up all over the country, and at the heart of the hype is the popular bánh mì sandwich: a mouthwatering, messy layering of juicy pork, cucumber, and sweet and tangy do chua, a slaw made with pickled carrots and daikon radishes. And the drooling doesn’t have to stop at your favorite Vietnamese deli. Now you can bring the sandwich craze to your kitchen with our yummy bánh mì recipe.
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4.5

Daikon Radish Kimchi
Daikon radish is another common kimchi, which soaks up the marinade phenomenally well and remains addictively crisp for a few days.Recipe courtesy of Stuart Brioza.Reprinted from Koreatown: A Cookbook. Copyright © 2016 by Deuki Hong and Matt Rodbard. Photographs copyright © 2016 by Sam Horine. Published by Clarkson Potter, an imprint of Penguin Random House, LLC.
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4

Looking like a white icicle and pleasantly mild in flavor, daikon’s crisp, cool properties make it tons of fun to juice. A hit of blueberries adds a second surprising twist.
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4

Tuna Carpaccio with Daikon and Wasabi Emulsion
Created by Singaporean chef Jusman So of the restaurant Dava at Bali's Ayana Resort, this elegant carpaccio with nori-braised daikon, wasabi emulsion, and yuzu-marinated daikon requires multiple steps but is simple overall. The key for this recipe is using high-quality sashimi-grade tuna loin.
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4

Seared Scallops with Pickled Daikon and Chile Jam
This is a complex yet elegant dish. To simplify it, you can leave out the chile jam and mix together a little sweet chile sauce, sunflower oil , Thai fish sauce, lime juice, and cilantro, using this to dress  the scallops and leaves. Still, we would make the jam: it’s completely addictive. Scully’s mother and nine aunties (yes, all on his mother’s side!) all have their own versions, each placing a different emphasis on the sour, spicy, sweet, and salty levels. Scully’s order  of preference, having played around with all the family recipes  and consulted  the authority on Thai cooking that is David Thomson, is sweet then sour then salty then spicy.The recipe makes enough to fill a medium jar (14 ounces/400 ml), but you can double the recipe if you like to keep a larger jar in the fridge. It will last for a month or more and is really versatile: as delicious with cold meat as it is spread in a cheese sandwich or spooned alongside some plain rice. Two disclaimers: first, don’t be put off by the smell of the dried shrimp in the pan. It’s not the ingredient’s strongest selling point, we know, but the resulting taste more than makes up for it. Second, sorry about all the garlic peeling and, no, twenty-four cloves is not a typo!Reprinted with permission from NOPI by Yotam Ottolenghi and Ramael Scully, copyright © 2015. Published by Ten Speed Press, an imprint of Penguin Random House LLC.
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4

I had the good fortune of growing up within a 20-minute drive of Los Angeles' Little Saigon, where it was common to find freshly baked baguettes cradling perfect slices of barbecue pork or pâté to the tune of three for $5. I've always wanted to try making my own. However, the gap between my cooking experience and dining experience with Vietnamese cuisine could not be further apart than New York and Saigon. So, when I set out to create my bánh mì, I knew that I could not hope to recreate an traditional version that would do those sandwich shops justice. I set out to create my own version. This recipe aims to be easier and more accessible in terms of ingredients. Instead of barbecue pork or pâté, I used roast chicken (which I made myself, but can easily be substituted with store-bought rotisserie). And in place of the mysteriously addictive butter (MSG anyone?) with equally mysterious ingredients, I made a simple homemade mayo. And lastly mint — bánh mì aficionados might find this strange (I myself have never seen mint in bánh mì before) but mint in general is used often in Vietnamese cuisine, and I think it's a nice touch. But, in the end, I think the most important thing is the bread. The bread still makes the sandwich, no matter what kind of sandwich it is. So make sure to find a truly excellent baguette that makes that crackling sound when you tear off a piece. Click here to see 8 Tasty Lunch Ideas for Work.
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4

Blackened Ahi Steak Sandwich
Learn how to make our famous Salt Creek Grille Princeton blackened ahi steak sandwich with a wasabi mayo, right in your own kitchen! Click Here to See More Ahi Tuna Recipes
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4

Spicy Kimchi Yuba “Noodles” With Poached Egg
The question of Stuart Brioza’s love of kimchi is answered with a trip up a wobbly ladder to a secret loft space turned fermentation lab above his insanely popular San Francisco restaurant, State Bird Provisions. In this crawl space, we spotted large buckets of napa cabbage and daikon radish kimchi, which the chef makes year-round using chopped-up Beausoleil oysters. “I’m a Bay Area kid, so the idea of mixing cultures comes naturally to me,” he says, sipping an espresso in the restaurant’s sunny dining room. We’re talking about the marriage of Japanese yuba—the delicate skin that forms on top of soy milk while making tofu—with Korean kimchi, a dish he has served since the early days of State Bird, and one that has become one of the restaurants’ signatures.Brioza was nice enough to slip us the recipe, and we’ve made it many times since. Whenever we can find fresh yuba, sold at Asian supermarkets, we have this relatively simple recipe top of mind. The inviting, fragile-but-chewy texture of the tofu skin and the richness of the egg yolk are beautifully contrasted with a burst of Kimchi Vinaigrette (recipe follows). It’s easy to make, but also slightly chef-y and out of the box. And if you happen to be reading this during Dungeness crab season, it’s a great addition at the end. Reprinted from Koreatown: A Cookbook. Copyright © 2016 by Deuki Hong and Matt Rodbard. Photographs copyright © 2016 by Sam Horine. Published by Clarkson Potter, an imprint of Penguin Random House, LLC.
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4

Sriracha-Marinated Chicken Bánh Mì
Vietnamese bánh mì sandwiches have become so trendy over the past five years that it's almost painful. It's gotten to the point when you see one on a menu that you know before ordering that it's best to stray far, far away from that portion of it. Besides, why order something out that you can make just as well if not better at home. There, I said it. You don't have to be Vietnamese to make a good bánh mì, and it's easy. The basic ingredients for a bánh mì sandwich? Steamed, pan-roasted, or oven-roasted meat and soy fillings like Vietnamese sausage, pork patties, pork liver pâté, and grilled chicken, topped with cucumber slices, cilantro, shredded pickled carrots and daikon, mayonnaise, sliced chiles, and chile sauce. This simple recipe (really simple, I swear) combines two of the above ingredients — chicken (thigh meat) and chile sauce (Sriracha) — for a moist, flavorful effect. The key to great bánh mì? Moist meat. Adequate distribution. Overall moisture. And is just good bread with a thin crust and strategic layering technique for maximum ingredients and efficient distribution. This recipe was carried out using some really terrific bread baked by Leske's Bakery, a Bay Ridge, Brooklyn, original since 1961, and bought at Chubby Mary's, a new favorite sandwich shop by the Artichoke Basille crew in New York's East Village. What's the big deal about the bread? You don't need to go to Leske's or Chubby Mary's (though you could do much worse), but a really light and airy bread that's crusty outside and still moist and airy inside will be key. (Leske's would be great for a po'boy, too, by the way.)  Click here to see 7 Easy Sriracha Recipes.
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2

Oden
I am not sure what the right translation is for this recipe but oden is a one-pot dish, which is a little bit different from stew or hot pot. It's more like a simmered dish: assorted fish balls, fish cakes, atsuage (deep-fried tofu), hard-boiled eggs, konnyaku, and some vegetables are simmered in soy sauce-based broth. I usually make oden a day before so that all the ingredients will absorb good oden broth and it tastes much better the following day. In my house, I usually serve it with onigiri (rice balls). The color seems boring because it's mainly brown, but the flavor is amazing and exquisite.  Maybe that's why it's a lot of people's winter comfort dish. See all stew recipes.
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1