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littlepetel
I recently tried a Russian Honey Cake, which was one of the yummiest cakes I have ever tasted. It was so nice I decided to find the recipe and learn to make it myself. It took me about 6 months searching the net (on websites mostly in Russian, which I definitely don't read or speak) translating from Russian using an online translator, and trying different recipes before I found this recipe, which has produced a result at least as nice as the one I tried. I baked 2 pieces at a time on baking paper on an oven tray. Each batch took just long enough to cook, that I had two more ready to swap when the first ones were done. The cream filling (and coating) is made from sour cream and sugar. The sour cream is simply whipped with the sugar until the sugar dissolves. The original recipe said to add sugar "by intuition"; I think you're supposed to keep adding more until it thickens, but the time I tried that it was too sickly sweet! I have also made the filling/coating using fresh cream - 750ml, sour
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By Kara Zuaro
Editor's note: The recipe and introductory text below are from I Like Food, Food Tastes Good: In the Kitchen with Your Favorite Bands by Kara Zuaro. To read more about the book, see the related story. Patrick Phelan from Patrick himself Singer-songwriter Patrick Phelan crafts dreamy, lingering music, studies human rights, and has spent time in Italy to focus on his cooking, as he has been a chef for more than eleven years. This decadent dish is something you should save for a special occasion because (a) you're going to have to drop a lot of cash to make it happen, (b) you're going to need to kill a pair of lobsters in the process, and (c) it'll make your special day that much more special. This is a challenging recipe, but if you follow the directions carefully, you'll end up with a dish that's as fancy as it is comforting — and big enough to feed a crowd. If you're cooking for two, just make half — you'll still savor the leftovers for lunch the next day. "This recipe comes courtesy of the great influences of David Shannon, one of my many teachers over the years." —Patrick Phelan
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Susan Herrmann Loomis
(Le Gâteau de Maïs) This is an old-fashioned dish, a simple meal that Marie-Rose Sol makes often for herself and her husband, Gabriel. Farmers who have raised everything from foie gras geese to vegetables, they are semi-retired now and living by themselves, though not far from their children. For Marie-Rose that means cooking for two, something that she’s never quite gotten used to. "When I make this, I still make almost as much as I did when the family was here, and we eat it all, with salad!" she says. This dish, which is like a crisp corn pancake, is wonderful in late winter when the weather's still cold but no longer biting. Marie-Rose makes it when she wants something delicious that takes little effort. "Besides, this is one of Gabriel's favorite things," she says. It's simple and somewhat unusual, like a dessert but treated as a vegetable. There is very little batter to cover the apples, so the result is light and crisp. Don’t be afraid to bake the cake until it is just this side of burned on the edges and golden in the center, Serve it immediately upon removing it from the oven. You'll see that it goes perfectly with a garlicky salad! Try a simple Bergerac with this.
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The Gurgling Cod
Editor's note: This entry marks the first in a series called Sunday Night Soups. Our friend The Gurgling Cod will be concocting them and posting them. And, yeah, it's Saturday as we post this, but that's so you have some time to shop for and cook this recipe. Enjoy! —Adam Welcome to Sunday Night Soups, where each week Serious Eats will offer a soup appropriate to the week's Sunday Night Football game on NBC. This week's game sees Eli, the other Manning, and his New York Giants travel to Dallas to take on the Cowboys. The Texas venue basically demands beef, and a lot of beef, and New York has at least two Koreatowns, and that's enough of an excuse to make this Korean-spiced chili. The origin of this chili was Craig Claiborne's recipe in the New New York Times Cookbook, but necessity dictated a few audibles the first time I made it (Korean red pepper powder for chili powder, and Quaker oats for flour), and they worked out well enough that I've been making it like this ever since. This is more of a stew than a soup, but it is as close as you can get to steak you can eat with a spoon. Starting with cubed—rather than ground—beef produces a texture that is much more interesting than most chilis. You can adjust the heat up or down, depending on your taste, but if the heat seems too much as you cook, add two or three tablespoons of honey. Craig Claiborne's Beef Chili con Carne with Meat (Gurgling Cod Remix) Ideally, cook the night before, and reheat the next day.
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Robin Bellinger
Marcella Hazan, who introduced an America familiar with red sauce joints to true Italian food, is a teacher and writer with whom every home cook should spend some time. She was born in Italy but immigrated to the United States as a bride. Though she had never cooked before, she had to learn to feed her husband (hey, it was the 1950s), and luckily for all of us it turned out that she was no slouch. She began teaching Italian cooking in New York City and eventually published several books of her beautifully simple, authentic recipes. Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking combines two books Hazan published in the 1970s. The food here is, for the most part, straightforward and homey, and the instructions are detailed and clear. I often turn to this book when I’m not sure what to do with a vegetable or need new ideas for saucing pasta, but there are lots of big meaty dishes as well. Hazan’s lucid prose and stern instructions always charm me, as does the note of exasperation she sometimes cannot help but show (in a salad, “Garlic can be exciting when you turn to it sporadically, on impulse, but on a regular basis, it is tiresome,” and instant polenta—don’t even ask). Like all good recipe writers, she urges you to watch and taste and smell and listen, to pay close attention to your ingredients and how you use them instead of working through the recipe automatically. Indeed, her instructions for dressing a salad—extra virgin olive oil, salt, and wine vinegar only, please—fill me with anxiety and make me feel wholly inadequate as a cook. But it’s good to have something to aim for, and the food you turn out from this book will be heartily appreciated even before you achieve salad supertaster status. “There is no more perfect union in all gastronomy than the marriage of Bolgnese ragù with homemade Bolognese tagliatelle,” Hazan writes; I put this statement to the test on a frigid Sunday afternoon and now can verify it without hesitation. Making fresh pasta at home is fun and satisfying; it’s also easy, if you have a little hand-cranked pasta machine like mine. She provides instructions for making sheets of pasta with a rolling pin, too, but I’ve never been brave enough to get into that delicate business. These recipes are adapted from Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking; they make twice as much sauce as you will need for this quantity of pasta, so either double the pasta recipe or freeze half of the sauce for another time.
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Carolynn Carreño
Although you can find it grocery stores year-round, technically speaking, radicchio, like all members of the chicory family to which it belongs, is a winter vegetable. In this warm-ish slaw, the slightly bitter taste of radicchio is made more palatable with warm bacon and a touch of sugar in the dressing. Laced with loads of basil, it is also a gentle if perhaps premature reminder that summer still exists. Dressing the tomatoes separately with salt and either oil or vinaigrette is something that I learned from working with Nancy Silverton: if you make each layer of flavor as good as it can be, then the dish will be as good as it can be.Double this recipe if you're cooking for two, or if you want a wilted slaw with room temperature shrimp for tomorrow's lunch. You can also make it with sea scallops in place of the shrimp. Click here to see Shrimp Recipes for Any Day of the WeekCarolynn Carreño is the writer of the weekly column Cooking for One (Two if You're Lucky) and can also be found on her website.
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by
Hwin
I found this in a magazine and decided to try it. So glad I did! I made it for the first time last night and it is really great. I used 9 oz. fresh spinach instead of the frozen spinach, and it worked great. My husband even liked it, and he is not normally a spinach person. I used most of a 26 oz jar for 1/2 a recipe, so you may need more sauce than called for. I'm sure you could use homemade, too. Be flexible! Also, this recipe makes quite a bit. I am cooking for two people, and I froze half the stuffed shells for another time, and there were still plenty of leftovers. Freezing them works great! I flash froze the stuffed shells on a cookie sheet, then dumped them in a ziploc and stashed them in the deep freeze. I let them defrost for a day. Then you just have to add sauce, and cook! Perfect weeknight meal, but good enough to serve to company.
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Bergy
John is the kind of house guest you appreciate having especially when he makes these wonderful Quesadillas. He served them with sliced avocados and Chipolte Chutney (recipe#117377). It has a very hot, spicy, full bodied flavor that compliments these quesadillas to a Tee. Serve them hot off the pan, if cooking for two have two pans on the go. They are not the same if kept warm in the oven. Have a wee rest between servings they only take minutes to make after the veggies are cooked. Vary the vegetables if you wish-perhaps include sweet pepper, add mushrooms, use up left over vegetables. There is an endless variety of possibilities but I do love this recipe's combination. The measurements are for the finished chopped veggies. A small green salad goes nicely along side.
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Bergy
John is the kind of house guest you appreciate having especially when he makes these wonderful Quesadillas. He served them with sliced avocados and Chipolte Chutney (recipe#117377). It has a very hot, spicy, full bodied flavor that compliments these quesadillas to a Tee. Serve them hot off the pan, if cooking for two have two pans on the go. They are not the same if kept warm in the oven. Have a wee rest between servings they only take minutes to make after the veggies are cooked. Vary the vegetables if you wish-perhaps include sweet pepper, add mushrooms, use up left over vegetables. There is an endless variety of possibilities but I do love this recipe's combination. The measurements are for the finished chopped veggies. A small green salad goes nicely along side.
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by
Bergy
John is the kind of house guest you appreciate having especially when he makes these wonderful Quesadillas. He served them with sliced avocados and Chipolte Chutney (recipe#117377). It has a very hot, spicy, full bodied flavor that compliments these quesadillas to a Tee. Serve them hot off the pan, if cooking for two have two pans on the go. They are not the same if kept warm in the oven. Have a wee rest between servings they only take minutes to make after the veggies are cooked. Vary the vegetables if you wish-perhaps include sweet pepper, add mushrooms, use up left over vegetables. There is an endless variety of possibilities but I do love this recipe's combination. The measurements are for the finished chopped veggies. A small green salad goes nicely along side.
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Cactus Arm
I like this recipe because it is fresh, light, low calorie, low sodium, it is eazy to make, is a meatless dish and it has lots of flavor (sweet, garlic, tomato, with a little spice). It is a good alternative to traditional spaghetti with tomato sauce, and makes for a good summer dish. I got this recipe from a "Seniors/ Cooking for Two" category cookbook I checked out from the library. You can make a lot of substitutions in this recipe too. You can substitute frozen broccoli(instead of fresh), fresh tomatoes (instead of canned), pine nuts (instead of almonds), and spaghetti noodles (instead of linguine). I switch on using fresh vs canned/frozen ingredients depending on what is more economical (sometimes I will buy fresh broccoli when it is on sale and blanch what I don't use and save it in the freezer).
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IndinaMarie
I bought a six pack of Magic Hat's spring seasonal (Vinyl), and loved it so much I wanted to cook with it. Since I normally use deep, dark beers (like Guinness) to cook, and usually only for beef or vegetable stew, this was a bit of an experiment. All day, my apartment smelled AMAZING. Since I had to buy a three pound roast (the grocery store seems to only have VERY large roasts), and I'm only cooking for two people, this made a LOT of leftovers. I don't usually measure anything, so I'm guessing on a lot of this. Adjust everything to your taste. As for the veggies, I used two small white potatoes, 1/4 of a large vidalia onion, and about 1/2 cup of sliced carrots. Use what you like! The blend of spices is my usual go-to blend, again... use what you like. Recipes are made to be adapted!
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