Top Rated Confit Recipes

Lemon
A zesty recipe that works well with roast chicken. 
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5

Duck Confit
One duck confit aficionado shares his time-tested recipe and some tips for making it. 
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5

Herbs
For Todd English, Thanksgiving is all about having fun with ingredients, like mixing sweet potatoes with half and half  cream and lavender, or honey and marshmellow. But his favorite part? Turkey sandwiches the next day. English makes the recipe below for his actual dinner and prepares the breast meat separately: roasting until it's about 150 degrees inside, with super crispy skin. He finishes it off with a homemade giblet gravy and herbs for a hefty, savory sandwich. - Yasmin Fahr
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5

At Café Adelaide and the Swizzle Stick Bar, Chef Chris Lusk stuffs a French baguette with a roast chicken thigh confit, tomatoes, and pickles to create his interpretation of this classic Louisiana-style sub sandwich. 
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5

duck
The original method for making the dish is to cure duck legs in spices and salt, submerge them in duck fat, and cook them very slowly until they emerge crispy and crunchy from the oven. But just imagine the amount of duck fat needed! That’s why this recipe is such a godsend for duck confit-lovers. It does require a 24-hour wait before cooking, but the results are worth every minute.
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4.5

Sous Vide Brussels Sprout Confit
Brussels sprouts are delicious on their own or flavored! In this recipe, we add Chipotle tabasco to give the dish contrasting flavor. It is good throughout the year, but also as a side in our Thanksgiving Meal feature recipe. Cooking vegetables sous vide has a number of advantages to the traditional methods of steaming or boiling. Because the vegetables cook in a sealed bag, they retain all of their nutrients and, more importantly, all of their flavor. The natural sugars in vegetables are water-soluble, and in a boiling or steaming pot, these sugars will be whisked away into the surrounding water, leaving your vegetables dull and bland. When cooked sous vide, however, those flavors stay where they belong. And, as you’d expect, there’s no guesswork or fork-probing required to know when your vegetables are properly cooked. Vegetables are composed of plant cells, which are extremely tough and resilient compared to the cellular structure of meat. Veggies have to be tough – they can’t jump out of the ground and run away from predators. To transform hard brussel sprouts into a tender and yielding side dish, we have to break down those cell walls. Unlike meats, which typically cook between 50°C / 122°F and 65°C / 149°F, vegetables require much higher heat to soften. With a few specific exceptions, like corn and zucchini, most vegetables soften at temperatures between 80°C / 176°F and 88°C / 190°F.
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4.5

Mashed Potatoes with Garlic Confit
Mashed potatoes is a beloved side dish, but if you're like me, you might shy away from ordering it in restaurants because you know it's probably loaded with butter and cream. So I have no choice but to make my own! And what a joy it is to do so when the recipe yields a light, fluffy and — thanks to the garlic confit — uniquely flavorful result. When you whisk the hot milk into the potatoes, the purée becomes light as air. Just remember that a little butter goes a long way, so no need to use more than what the recipe calls for. The result? Creamy, guilt-free mashed potatoes with the subtle and rich flavor of garlic confit. I call that something to celebrate!
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4

Garlic Scape Confit
This garlic scape confit can be drizzled on salads, or do as I do — put some on your fried egg in the morning. Another option is to toss artichokes and lime zest with this garlicky dressing, or try serving it simply on some crispy bread. Click here to see In Season: Garlic Scapes.
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4

My Mother’s Honey Cake with Apple Confit
Honey cake is traditionally eaten for Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish new year — the honey’s sweetness symbolizes our wishes for a sweet year. This is my mother's recipe, which she makes in Israel, freezes, and sends to me in the mail. I’ve stopped reminding her that I’m a chef and accept the package gratefully. The cake holds up really well and is very easy to make. I love a slice with coffee in the afternoon, but this cake also works in savory applications — think goat cheese spread on top, beneath a piece of seared foie gras, or — don’t tell your grandma — with chopped liver. For dessert, we serve the cake with apple confit; apples that have been cooked very slowly in syrup until they are a beautiful, translucent amber color with an incredible jelly-like texture. Treated this way, the apples keep well in the fridge and I love to have them around during the fall.From Zahav: A World of Israeli Cooking. Copyright ©2015 by Michael Solomonov and Steven Cook. Used by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved.
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4

Potato Latkes with Apple Confit and Crispy Sage
The classic potato latke gets a makeover! Made with shallots instead of onions, these potato latkes are delicate and slightly sweet. Served with a dollop of apple confit spiked with calvados, and a buttery, crispy sage leaf, each mouthful of these latkes yields an explosion of flavor. See all latke recipes.
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3.10465

Grilled Cheese Sandwich with Garlic Confit and Baby Arugula
What is it about melted cheese? Just about anything oozing with melted cheese tastes delicious — like melted mozzarella on a flatbread pizza; sweet, nutty Asiago in a luscious mac and cheese; or earthy fontina in an unbearably sinful fondue with chipotle and tequila. But perhaps the simplest recipe — the most adored of all — is the grilled cheese sandwich. When prepared with a crusty bread and stuffed with a cheese that melts to perfection, it is essentially irresistible. Here, this beloved sandwich takes on a gourmet twist. The secret ingredient: garlic confit! When garlic is gently poached in olive oil, it becomes sweet, with a subtle flavor. The cloves become so soft that you can spread them on your toast — or in this case, in your grilled cheese sandwich. Pair the mellow garlic confit with zingy baby arugula and a nutty, pungent aged Cheddar, Gruyère, or fontina, and every luscious bite is mouthwatering. Click here to see the Garlic Confit Recipe.
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2.789475

Garlic Confit
Life without garlic? I would rather never have to contemplate such a thing. The tiny cloves of the mythical Allium sativum plant are pungent, intensely aromatic, and impressively flavorful — an irreplaceable and unique ingredient. I always marvel at what one little clove of garlic can do. Whether sautéed, roasted, or used raw, its presence transforms any dish in the most dramatic, delicious way. But have you ever tried making garlic confit? If you haven’t, then you’re in for a wonderful treat. The term confit is used to describe anything that has been cooked slowly into a rich, succulent texture. To confit garlic, the cloves are very gently poached in oil, transforming them into the most delicate, sweet, and tender morsels. A dream! The confit cloves can be used to flavor soups, sauces, pastas, vinaigrettes, marinades, or mashed potatoes. For a quick but sublime nibble, spread them on a crusty slice of bread. Use the oil in salad dressings and marinades, drizzle it on veggies, or dip some bread in it.
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1.8