Top Rated Bûche de Noël Recipes

by
Southern Living JANUARY 1999
Bûche de Noël is a traditional French Christmas cake shaped and decorated to look like a tree log. It's filled and frosted with silky chocolate buttercream. Crunchy meringue mushrooms are the perfect contrast. Chopped pistachios scattered around resemble moss growing on the (chocolate) log.
0

by
Christmas with Southern Living 1999, Oxmoor House 1999
0

by
Lauren Weisenthal
Making a traditional Bûche de Noël is a lengthy project that requires time and planning. you'll want to make many of the components in advance so they have time to chill: the mushroom meringues, soaker, compote, and pastry cream keep for up to 2 days before use. Once you're ready to go, make the sponge for the cake just before assembly. It should cool but should not sit too long or it will dry out and crack. This cake features a flavor combination that I learned from a French baker who told me her mother made it this way when she was a girl. The combination of chestnuts, cranberries, and praline is unique, and transports her back to her childhood. The recipe for the chestnut pastry cream is adapted from Johnny Iuzzini's recipe, which appeared originally on the Martha Stewart Show.
0

by
All You DECEMBER 2008
0

by
Kerry Saretsky
Bûche de Noël
0

by
Judy Moy
A traditional bûche de Noël is a French Christmas specialty made from a thin sponge cake that's iced, rolled up, and decorated to look like a Yule log. Here, we've created a simpler single-serving version that makes a great project with kids. Yodel snack cakes stand in for the rolled-up sponge cakes, and the fun comes from decorating them with frosting, candies, and anything else you wish.
0

by
Margaret Agnew, Christmas with Southern Living 2002, Oxmoor House 2002
This traditional French Christmas cake isn't hard to make. The cake is a basic sponge cake, and once it's in the oven, the icing's a breeze. The fun comes when you fill, roll, and frost the cake and it takes on the look of a log.
0

This is a simple recipe for a wonderful bûche de Noël. The cake is a bit heartier than the typical genoise, which suits my taste, and the hint of cinnamon gives it an aromatic layer of flavor. You may change and adjust flavorings, drizzle the cake with a rum or a sugar syrup flavored with vanilla after it's cooled, or do any number of things to make it your own.
0

by
Dede Wilson
Peppermint ice cream and chocolate cake are rolled up into the quintessential holiday treat.
0

by
Dominique Ansel
Every year during Christmas week, executive pastry chef Dominique Ansel of Daniel in New York City serves guests complimentary mini bûches de Noël. His version here is lighter than many, thanks to the beaten egg whites in the batter and the use of whipped cream in place of buttercream as frosting.
0

This updated version of France's Christmas classic features orange mousse in a chocolate sponge cake roll and a decadent garnish of chocolate truffles. Kumquats and festive greenery add even more glamour.
0

The traditional French "Christmas log" is accompanied by meringue mushrooms; the ones here—formed out of marzipan (a paste made from almonds, sugar and egg whites)—are much easier to do. Look for marzipan at specialty foods stores and in the baking products section of supermarkets.
0